Measuring the speed of resource loading with JavaScript and HTML5

This is a follow up article to Measuring site performance with JavaScript on mobile, I suggest you read it before you continue. In the previous article I talked about the Navigation Timing spec, here I will talk about the Performance Timeline and Resource Timing specs and how they work in IE10, the first browser to implement them. I created a page that shows some of the data available and a library that generates a HAR that you can later analyse.

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Measuring site performance with JavaScript on mobile

There is a lot of talk around responsive Web design being too slow or too resource intensive and that other methodologies can achieve better performance. I don’t want to go into the details of which approach is better because I think different scenarios require different solutions. What is certainly true in all cases is that a Web site or app that loads faster is better than one that is slow.¬†Companies like Google, Gomez and Akamai have all published papers and survey results showing how speed affects user perception of a service from your desktop computer and even more on a mobile device (KISSmetrics has also drawn a nice infographic for the lazy ones). This is the first article and another one will follow shortly. Continue reading “Measuring site performance with JavaScript on mobile”

Go mobile with WP Super Cache and the Mobile Pack

If you want your blog to stay as fast as possible and you want to support mobile users you will have to reach some compromise.

This was true until today. With the WordPress Mobile Pack version 1.2.1 you now can get the best of both worlds. Here is a quick guide on how to achieve it. I am assuming you have installed the latest version of WP Super Cache, already.
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Making Super Cache and mobile work well

If you are using WordPress for anything critical beyond your local football team, then you know that the use of a cache plugin is a must.

WP Super Cache is the best known cache plugin, if not the most famous plugin of all. Initially it did not play well with admins that also wanted a mobile presence and it is very simple to explain, the whole purpose of the cache is to generate the file dynamically once, store it and then serve it again without any further computation. As the years went by, mobile became more important and WP Super Cache integrated a basic mobile support. Recently donncha introduced a fundamental new feature, the ability for other plugins to define actions. I will not go into the details of how this works and what you can do, you can read all of it on the WordPress site.
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