HTML5 forms (and IE10 (Mobile))

One of the many improvements introduced by HTML5 is around forms, users hate filling forms and developers hate validating the data submitted. HTML5 makes these tasks a lot simpler.
In this article I will not talk about what HTML5 added, but I will rather focus on what is new in IE10 mobile, i.e. the browser that comes with Windows Phone 8. At the end of the article I have collected a few useful links that cover HTML5 forms at large and provide more examples and complete support tables. All the code examples are meant to be cross-browser, unless specified. Continue reading “HTML5 forms (and IE10 (Mobile))”

WML, Widgets and HTML5 web apps, they are all the same thing

I like to observe how in technology (and often in life) things are repeated. Sometimes they are just the same thing again and again, other times they are slightly different. Especially in technology, some ideas fail because they are missing some pieces or because their timing was not perfect, this of course allows for refinement and repetition.
Continue reading “WML, Widgets and HTML5 web apps, they are all the same thing”

Flash, Flashlite, SVG and Java

Flash is a huge success on the web. It’s been like that for a long time now.

SVG is a recommendation (read standard) by the W3C that should address some of the functionalities of Flash.

While Flash Lite has been very successful in Japan for many years (and I think simply because DoCoMo decided it would be the default on all devices), it has struggled in the rest of the world.

In the last couple of years Nokia, Sony Ericsson and other top vendors have more or less quietly implemented SVG Tiny (a subset of SVG for mobile devices). From my perspective it seemed like SVG would take over Flash (Lite) in the mobile space, but it looks Adobe is moving to make sure this does not happen.

A few news that I’ve read in the last couple of weeks, all within just a few days:

mobileAJAX Workshop

On Sep 28 2007, in San Francisco, USA, the mobileAJAX workshop was held. I have not joined it, but it was good to read a couple of reports.

The W3C has published the official minutes of the meeting.

Also interesting to read the scratchpad used during the meeting.

I wonder where will (mobile) widgets go. I’m a bit skeptic. I think there’s much more than widgets to use AJAX. It wasn’t the main topic of the workshop but seems like it was one of the main points.

Arun’s views on the new HTML Charter

Arun Ranganathan from AOL has come with a public blog post about HTML 5, the status of XHTML2 and why AOL is going to be active in HTML and NOT in XHTML2.
In two words he’s saying that AOL is not going to work in XHMTL2 because they are not browser vendors and so that’s not their field, but that they are going to work in HTML WG (and the development of HTML5) because they are content providers.

XHTML2 is just a draft, it’s a future implementation, so it might make sense to leave it to browser vendors, but then why bother to work in HTML 5? To me, this means that XHTML2 is dead for AOL and that HTML 5 is the way to go.

Isn’t this a HUGE thing?

Read the full article: (Re)birthing Pangs: The HTML Charter Revisited.